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Acrochordons

An acrochordon is a small, soft, common, benign, usually pedunculated neoplasm that is found particularly in persons who are obese. It is usually skin colored or hyperpigmented, and it may appear as surface nodules or papillomas on healthy skin. They are very common skin diseases which can be defined as benign skin growths that occur most often after midlife. is usually skin colored or hyperpigmented, and it may appear as surface nodules or papillomas on healthy skin. Acrochordons are small growths of skin that some people develop on the face, neck, armpits, and the groin The most frequent localizations are the neck and the axillae, but any skin fold, including the groin, may be affected. Acrochordons or Cutaneous tags are very common, generally benign skin growths that occur most often after midlife. They are tiny skin protrusions, and may have a small narrow stalk connecting the skin bump to the surface of the skin.

The following factors may play a role in Acrochordons causes:

  • Chaffing and irritation from skin rubbing together
  • Human papilloma virus (wart virus)
  • High levels of growth factors, particularly during pregnancy or in acrogmegaly (gigantism)
  • Insulin resistance (syndrome X)

Acrochordons are usually painless and do not grow or change, except for occasional irritation from rubbing by clothing or other friction. Their origin is unknown.

Cause of Acrochordons

Most Cause of Acrochordons:

  • The tendency to develop skin tags is inherited (runs in families).
  • Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and alpha tissue growth factor (TGF) have also been implicated in the development of tumors such as these.
  • The precise cause is unknown.
  • It is also thought that pendulous variations may be caused by losses of large confluent areas of elastin; however, a recent study of elastic tissue in fibroepithelial polyps (FEPs) showed no significant abnormalities.
  • Frequent irritation
  • Human papilloma virus (wart virus)
  • Insulin resistance (Syndrome x)
  • Hormone imbalances may facilitate the development of acrochordons (eg, high levels of estrogen and progesterone during pregnancy, high levels of growth hormone in acromegaly)

Symptoms of Acrochordons

Some of Symptoms of Acrochordons :

  • Skin growth
  • usually skin colored occasianally darker
  • may have a narrow stalk
  • They are tiny skin protrusions, and may have a small narrow stalk connecting the skin bump to the surface of the skin.
  • Usually very small, but sometimes half an inch long
  • Located on the neck, armpits, trunk, body folds, or other areas.

Diagnosis of Acrochordons

Diagnosis of Acrochordons is based primarily on the appearance of the skin growth.

Treatment of Acrochordons

Treatment is usually not necessary unless the cutaneous tags are irritating or are cosmetically displeasing. The growths may be surgically removed, removed by freezing, or electrically burning off (cautery).

Some people have their skin tags disappear if they take chromium picolinate 200 mcg twice a day. This trace element is available at health food and drug stores without a prescription.

  • Other methods of removal include cryotherapy and ligation with a suture or a copper wire; however, freezing of the surrounding skin during liquid nitrogen cryotherapy may result in dyschromic lesions
  • Small, pedunculated acrochordons may be removed with curved or serrated blade scissors, while larger skin tags may simply require excision. For small acrochordons, application of aluminum chloride prior to removal will decrease the amount of minor bleeding.
  • Carbon dioxide cryotherapy involves making a cylinder of frozen carbon dioxide snow (–78.5C) or a slush combined with acetone. It is applied directly to the skin lesion.
  • Usually no special attention is needed during the healing phase. The treated area may be gently washed once or twice daily, and should be kept clean
  • The treatment is repeated in some cases, once thawing has completed. This is known as a ‘double freeze-thaw' and is usually reserved for skin cancers or resistant viral warts.

 


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