Your Child’s Mental Health Diagnosis Isn’t a Parental Failure

0

Let’s not forget that he didn’t become famous for his acting but for showing off his abs in the “Good Vibrations” video.

Given that Wahlberg’s time as a pop star was three decades ago, he couldn’t believe it when he heard the music being played at the dance.

“[Grace] sitting there at the edge of the stage, next to the DJ. And then I’m sitting there with another dad and I’m like, ‘This is not an edited version of this song. There are explicit lyrics played at a girls’ school dance and I’m no good,'” he said.

“I told the DJ and he was like, ‘Oh, I thought that was it.’ I said what are you doing?’ I hear F-bombs and that and that’s not right,” Wahlberg said.

He is right. There’s no room for music with explicit lyrics at a 10-year-old ball.

Wahlberg says the DJ didn’t know he wasn’t playing the edited version, but it’s more likely he didn’t even realize the song was a problem. Pop music these days is filled with a numbing amount of violent and misogynistic lyrics.

A recent study by the University of Missouri found that almost a third of pop songs contain lyrics that degrade or belittle women by portraying them as submissive or sexually objectified.

Currently, three of the top five songs on the Billboard Top 40 contain the word “bitch.” One of them is sung in Korean.

It’s odd that Americans have become more susceptible to pop culture misogyny in movies, TV, and comedy, but still have a huge cultural blind spot when it comes to music.

That’s not a good thing, especially when pop music is aimed at teenagers.

“We know that music has a strong impact on young people and how they view their role in society,” said Cynthia Frisby, a professor at the Missouri School of Journalism.

“Unlike rap or hip-hop, pop music tends to have a bubbly, uplifting sound meant to draw listeners in,” Frisby continued. “But it can be problematic if the lyrics under the sound encourage violence and misogynistic behavior.”

Let’s face it, pop stars are role models. Their examples show young people what to wear and how to behave. That doesn’t mean kids will blindly follow someone just because they like their music. But it has an undeniable effect.

Wahlberg, and any parent who monitors what their children listen to, deserve credit for protecting the minds and hearts of their children.

Frisby has some great advice for parents concerned about negative imagery in pop music.

“Ask your daughters and sons what songs they like to listen to and have conversations about how the songs might impact who they are,” Frisby said.

“For example, many songs may make young girls feel like they have to look and act provocatively for a boy to like them, when that’s not necessarily the case. If kids and teens understand that what they hear isn’t healthy behavior, so they might be more likely to challenge what they hear on the radio.”

He is right. There’s no room for music with explicit lyrics at a 10-year-old ball.

Wahlberg says the DJ didn’t know he wasn’t playing the edited version, but it’s more likely he didn’t even realize the song was a problem. Pop music these days is filled with a numbing amount of violent and misogynistic lyrics.

A recent study by the University of Missouri found that almost a third of pop songs contain lyrics that degrade or belittle women by portraying them as submissive or sexually objectified.

Currently, three of the top five songs on the Billboard Top 40 contain the word “bitch.” One of them is sung in Korean.

It’s odd that Americans have become more susceptible to pop culture misogyny in movies, TV, and comedy, but still have a huge cultural blind spot when it comes to music.

That’s not a good thing, especially when pop music is aimed at teenagers.

“We know that music has a strong impact on young people and how they view their role in society,” said Cynthia Frisby, a professor at the Missouri School of Journalism.

“Unlike rap or hip-hop, pop music tends to have a bubbly, uplifting sound meant to draw listeners in,” Frisby continued. “But it can be problematic if the lyrics under the sound encourage violence and misogynistic behavior.”

Let’s face it, pop stars are role models. Their examples show young people what to wear and how to behave. That doesn’t mean kids will blindly follow someone just because they like their music. But it has an undeniable effect.

Wahlberg, and any parent who monitors what their children listen to, deserve credit for protecting the minds and hearts of their children.

Frisby has some great advice for parents concerned about negative imagery in pop music.

“Ask your daughters and sons what songs they like to listen to and have conversations about how the songs might impact who they are,” Frisby said.

“For example, many songs may make young girls feel like they have to look and act provocatively for a boy to like them, when that’s not necessarily the case. If kids and teens understand that what they hear isn’t healthy behavior, so they might be more likely to challenge what they hear on the radio.”

Share.

Comments are closed.